Save That Stuff: A Sustainable Waste Management Option - Boston Local Food Festival Boston Local Food Festival : Presented by Sustainable Business Network of Massachusetts

Boston Local Food Festival

Presented by Sustainable Business Network of Massachusetts

Save That Stuff: A Sustainable Waste Management Option

The Boston Local Food Festival is going to have ZERO WASTE. That means that all food scraps will be composted, and all plates, bottles, and flatware will be recycled thanks to Save That Stuff. In addition to providing a low-impact, low-guilt experience at the Festival, what can Save That Stuff do for you?

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Save That Stuff is up for the challenge. Their Center for Hard to Recycle Materials (CHaRM) is constantly at work finding new homes for everything from car bumpers to golf clubs, so don’t be afraid to ask what they can do with your discarded oddities.

One idea Save That Stuff is bouncing around as a way to reuse materials is to develop an artist in residence program, putting a local creative to work putting sculpture on display, thus upcycling some of the more CHaRM-ing found objects. Check out their website if this sounds like it’s up your alley!

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STS has been growing since 1990, when they pioneered the project with one whimsical white Volkswagen bus. In the last 24 years, they’ve seen sustainability and green waste management become more of a priority to individuals and businesses all over the Boston area, and they’ve gained expertise now just in how to best get rid of recyclable waste, but how doing so can positively impact a businesses’ bottom line.

So be sure to make it to Boston Local Food Festival  this fall on the Greenway, and sort your trash into the various bins with pride, knowing you’re taking part in a truly waste-free event.

This post was brought to you by Jane Ward of Corn Free July, go check her out!

Posted by: Nicola on August 6, 2014 @ 9:00 am
Filed under: Blog,Boston Local Food Festival,Corn Free July,Sponsor Announcements,Sustainability